Glueing Paintings Together

This morning I woke up and glued two paintings together. I glued the “painting” part of the painting to the other “painting” – meaning I squished two faces together. Or perhaps I smashed two windows together. Or perhaps they are infinity mirrors.

I think I would like to show this first one on a wall where the cradles of the paintings would be hung so that the object sticks out like a street sign, but this is a first draft.

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Infinity Mirror 2017 two acrylic on canvas paintings and glue 12x12x3″

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Two Paintings Glued Together 2017 acrylic, ink, graphite, and oil on panel 6x6x3″

I have been smashing these things together for some time – taking what might be considered singular endeavors and straining them through a screen of multiple to change their vocabulary. I think I have been trying to follow the thought processes of minimalism by reducing things to essences, but I think I am doing that by foregrounding that minimalist process. So maybe it is minimalism staring at minimalism.

One Pixel of a Jay Hendrick Painting 006, 2012, digital print, dimensions vary

One Pixel of a Jay Hendrick Painting 006, 2012, digital print, dimensions vary

This is an older piece from 2012 where I zoomed in 3200% onto one of my paintings and then took a screenshot then printed it out. This one is fascinating because it also looks like a Rothko.

I have also squished multiple paintings together in order to conflate the whole process and praxis of making itself. In The Average Color of 100 Paintings, I made one-hundred paintings and collected the slurry then put that slurry on a microscope slide, declaring that an average of the one-hundred paintings made.

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The Average Color of 100 Paintings 2015 acrylic on microscope slide in wooden box 8.5x5x1″ at the University of the District of Columbia

The arbitrary number of 100 has consistently been something I have used. 100 is just a number – or a larger number than 1. It seems to me to be an ambitious number to append to paintings. Some people spend 100 hours on a single painting. Some people might not even make 100 paintings in their lives. So what does it mean to squish 100 paintings together?

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100 Paintings 2015 one-hundred acrylic paintings on a 20×16” stretcher on easel 74x37x37” at the Taubman Museum in Roanoke, VA

 

 

 

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