Archive for the ‘ Linn Meyers ’ Category

Befuddlement, Labor, and Collaboration

Blogging about this process is difficult because there are ten trillion potential elaborations to elucidate. There are many things occurring in the studio and they all want attention.

On Homogeneity and Heterogeneity

The long, stretch/re-stretch process seems to want most of the attention. This process is a nomad, dragging me along. All the paintings interact with each other. A painter might have a career wherein each painting leads to the other. An idea occurs that leads to a new idea, and on and on. This process is similar but it is all happening at once and in one painting. Maybe time is conflated with this project.

All the paintings are touching each other. The stretcher is an artificial framing device to set up a singular working space, but the old paintings are still present. The history of the making is present with each painting because each “new” painting literally contains old paintings.

The painting (pictured below) is emblematic of this process. There are five previous paintings present. The top left corner, the violet one on the left, the one with red stripes, the one with the large pink portion, and the lattice green grid. All of those paintings interacting with the un-painted canvas. There are drips but it is alone and I need to find ways to deal with this mess.

2016-10-03-16-10-23

detail of a work in progress

On Labor

There is also a question of labor. How much is enough? How much time spent makes a thing good. In the past, I have made very simple paintings. Single gestures. The idea might be that the simple painting could be good if that singular gesture can hold the viewer. If it has conflict. It if it dramatic enough. If it has unity and variety. The whole potential for how we might assess “goodness.” So with a “simple” painting the labor portion might occur before and after its making. The painter, with years of study, approaches the canvas, makes the singular gesture, then walks away. In its simplicity it is vulnerable. Perhaps empathy can be extracted from that moment. A little breath.

hendrickjay3

Untitled, 2013, acrylic, graphite, and oil on wood, 6×6″

But the “goodness,” might occur in the long making. One-hundred hours on a painting. If a viewer sees Linn Meyers’ work at the Hirshhorn that viewer can discern that labor occurred. Time spent in making. Time spent might tend towards goodness.

linn-meyers1

Linn Meyers, Our View From Here, photo by Jay Hendrick

I wonder if time spent equals goodness. That can’t be true. There has to be something in between the time spent. There has to be effort in the labor.

That is a concept that frustrates with this current painting. It has a certain momentum. It might just be a deadline, but this painting has an urgency. I want to make it. I want, not to finish it, but to maintain the erratic learning that is occurring. The painting is a conundrum – unstable and frustrating.

2016-10-02-15-29-04

It is further frustrating because I wonder how much work I should do for each painting. How much labor should go into each painting that will create the whole painting? My approach has been to make each painting good, as if it could be good on its own. That’s when I un-stretch then re-stretch. But none of them are ever truly separate form each other. It is artificial to think of them as separate.

On Collaboration

I have had several artists to visit the studio at VisArts. There have been painting exchanges  and discussions of where to go next. What I had hoped would occur has been occurring: I am learning from other people. It is very easy to become engaged in one’s own work. This process is disruptive, perhaps as much as the stretching/re-stretching.

I have made a few attempts at working with other people’s paintings. Becca Kallem’s painting has been leafed. Becca is interested in art history. It is present in her work. For me, I keep those things between my teeth, near the gums but this collaboration is bringing them to the fore, causing me to address my influences.

2016-10-03-17-05-06

Becca Kallem and Jay Hendrick, Greco (pink tag), 2016, acrylic and spray paint on canvas, 30×27″

This pink painting is interesting. Becca told me she was working with El Greco, The Burial of Count Orgasz, for this particular painting. The triangles present in that work by “the Greek.” The triangle occurs often with Becca. The triangle might be taken as canonical when thinking about Becca’s work. And it reminded me of my art history courses. My professors pointedly speaking about the presence of triangles in the composition.

el_greco_orgasz

El Greco, The Burial of the Count of Orgaz, 1588, oil on canvas, 480 × 360 cm

This discussion bred new things in my own work. The appearance of the triangle.

2016-09-24-15-51-31

detail of a singular painting among many paintings within an unfinished work

This art historical quotation continued in the collaboration between Becca and myself. When I first began making paintings, the tradition of Byzantine icon painting became important as an inquiry and as a vocabulary in painting. There was a structure and methodology to making those paintings

This thinking has been borrowed by me and carried forward, put through many filters and come out the other end for me as a sort of signifier. I use burnt sienna. Not because it is yet another color, but because it links back to that icon painting, to the methods of my canonical lineage. Becca’s paintings made me think about those art historical influence and a tiny fleck of gold leaf on her painting was like a canonical lightning bolt. To leaf her painting would bring up her brush work yet it would also push everything back. The leaf would tug back to that icon painting, and to the lack of icons in my own protestant church upbringing.

2016-09-30-19-30-49

unfinished collaboration between Becca Kallem and Jay Hendrick, 2016, gold leaf, acrylic, and oil on canvas, 29×16″

This collaboration has me thinking of canon and I must address that canon of art. This project is working within that vein. I am wanting to collaborate with these people because they are themselves canonical to me. They represent different approaches to painting. They are now-ness. Living future subjects of art history. Somewhere within the local quotations is something good.

I have also begun a collaboration between Kathryn McDonnell. We exchanged paintings and she wants to try this stretching and re-stretching method.

http://kathrynmcdonnell.com

Linn Meyers: Our View From Here